AEA Europe 2016: Let’s talk about assessment!

By Sabine Meinck & David Rutkowski

Why go to Cyprus in November? Well, yes, the weather is good and the Mediterranean Sea is beautiful, but that wasn’t our only reason. In addition to the wonderful weather and food, we enjoyed inspiring talks and critical discussions about educational assessments and their social and political underpinnings at the 17th annual conference of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe (AEA-Europe). During the conference we learned a great deal about new ways to approach methodological issues, as well as cultural and social differences when assessing achievement. Novel and interesting solutions for computer-based delivery systems were presented, and the conference provided a forum for us to initiate new collaborations and build synergies in various fields.

Obviously, we were also there to contribute to the conference. Here the IEA and the Centre for Educational Measurement at the University of Oslo (CEMO) pooled our capabilities and personal skills to deliver a workshop on how to write a policy brief based on IEA data. We were enthused by the dedication of the workshop participants, especially as a sunny beach was waiting only a few meters away. It was a great pleasure to introduce IEA studies and their challenges, outline the features of a good policy brief, and discuss the challenges and opportunities that may arise from the various national circumstances.

We dearly hope to soon see the briefs arising from this workshop!

 

Dr Sabine Meinck is Head of the Research, Analysis & Sampling Unit at the IEA, and Professor David Rutkowski is editor of IEA’s policy brief series, professor at the University of Oslo and researcher at CEMO. In February 2016, the IEA and CEMO signed an agreement to enhance collaboration between the two organizations and cooperate to promote international educational research.

For more information about IEA Policy Briefs, please go to the IEA website.

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